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thirty years of experience in restoring wood, coal, and gas stoves.

I currently have a large number of wood/coal ranges by Glenwood, Crawford, Fairmount, Premier, Household, Herald, Oakland, Glendale, etc. These are priced in restored condition from $1700 and up depending on rarity etc. I also have many in various original colored enamels. Let me know your needs and I can probably help.

In the column below you will find types of stoves I sell and a list of stoves currently for sale.


QUEEN ATLANTIC

Queen Atlantic

Combination for Coal, Wood and Gas
Queen Atlantic with box high shelf and end gas attachment.


GLENWOOD - "OURWAY"

Glenwood Ourway

SUPERIOR CONSTRUCTION


d
OUR
GLENWOOD

glenwood wood parlor
GLENWOOD
WOOD PARLOR

modern glenwood
MODERN GLENWOOD
OAK PARLOR

glenwood base heaater
GLENWOOD
BASE HEATER

glenwood "k" open base range

GLENWOOD "K"
OPEN BASE RANGE

glenwood open range with water tank
GLENWOOD "K"
OPEN BASE RANGE WITH WATER TANK
glenwood "E"
MODERN GLENWOOD
HOME GRAND # 280
modern glenwood home grand 208
MODERN GLENWOOD HOME GRAND # 208
glenwood e

GLENWOOD "E"
glenwood e with gas side car
GLENWOOD "E"
WITH GAS SIDE CAR

Trades etc.

We do take trades if you have a stove we can use. We are also open to other trades. My son is a collector of mechanical music: band organs, nickelodeons, disk music boxes etc. He also restores antique marine engines if they are prior to about WW 1. I like antique autos prior to WW 2 and both of us have Federal Firearms Licenses. I have a fondness for old double barrel shotguns. My first Golden Retriever was traded in on a stove. Best deal I ever made. So if you need a stove and have an interesting trade give us a call.


Stewart Base Heater

Stewart Base Heater

I am always looking for unusual stoves. I like large to very large stoves even though I have no place to even light one. We like Oak stoves and any stove with an extention barrel on top. This is a Stewart Round Base Heater model 76 from 1888. It was in a general store that closed back in the 50's and just came to light. They also made a similar stove that was oval and it must be pretty special. If you have an unusual stove I would like to hear about it and perhaps purchase it.


SUMMER SALE GOING ON NOW!

SUMMER SALE GOING ON NOW!

There is now a new alternative to an antique stove at the Stove Hospital! We have always been true to stocking only antique stoves as their design and construction has proven to be a superior product to ANYTHING made today with virtues like being off the grid, and not being reliant on electricity to function. In the past few weeks, we have discovered a new type of stove that we feel is going to revolutionize home heating and make the heavy, breakdown prone, electricity reliant pellet stoves a thing of the past! Based on many requests for pellet stoves, we have decided to become a dealer for the WiseWay gravity fed pellet stove. Finally there is a well designed pellet stove available for those customers, who for one reason or another, either can't have or don't want an antique stove. The new WiseWay pellet stove is entirely off the grid meaning it DOES NOT have any blowers, augers, electric motors, electronic thermostats, or heating elements to burn out or malfunction. This new modernistic design drafts by itself up a standard pellet stove chimney, and requires tending exactly twice a day like a coal stove. It is hopper fed, and can burn up to 30 hours + on a bag of pellets on the low setting. It is capable of a 57,900 BTU output, but can be throttled down considerably as well, and this stove is completely compliant with all UL listings for use where modern building codes prohibit an antique stove. The clearance required for this stove is as little as 2 inches from combustible walls, and is a wonderful addition to any home as an insurance policy against high fossil fuel prices and sudden emergencies. If time allows, I invite you to watch this video of the new WiseWay stove in action at the following address: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQgoNhPm0vg Feel free to come by our vintage showroom for a demonstration of the new WiseWay stove, and perhaps this is a better choice for your specific needs than an older stove. Affordable at close to half the price of conventional pellet stoves! $1899.00 plus tax NOW ONLY $1550.00. (ONLY THREE LEFT!)
SOME INTERESTING POINTS:
- UL Listed for easy installation by any licensed contractor with provided instructions.
- Portable: weighs only 113 pounds! (stove can be stored elsewhere in warm months)
-FIVE YEAR WARANTEE!
-Half the cost of "other pellet stoves"
-Requires no electricity ever!
-Will burn both hard and soft wood pellets!
-Can burn effectively with as little as a 12 foot chimney!
-Set up for internal OR external air intake for super insulated home compatibility.
- Stove can be run in a fashion to "self clean" flues.or can be cleaned with a garden hose at the end of the heating season!
-Accessory water heating coils available and water distillation tower available soon.
-SUPER LOW POLLUTION and compliant with post 2020 pollution requirements! (something all other pellet stoves can not do currently, and will thus be phased out of existence)
- Modern design fits in with decor of most homes.


Two odd models just finished!

Two odd models just finished!

Two odd models just finished!

WOW! We have just finished two unusual ranges from the Glenwood company. The two color unit is a Glenwood "C" (labeled as a Crescent) which is quite common, but not in this color option! We have heard of several of these in this color scheme over the last 40 years, but never had the chance to own one until now! As you can see by the picture, the colors do work well with each other and it really lights up the kitchen. It is a real treat for us at the shop to find a stove with original porcelain that can be saved and made presentable again. All too often time and general use has taken its toll and the porcelain generally has to go.

The other stove is a Cabinet Glenwood "K" in gray porcelain with the matching overhead AND underslung warming closets! This particular stove was also ordered originally with what is known as the machined and oiled cooksurface. This was an optional extra that made for a super smooth and level cooktop. When ordered originally, I am sure the customer had in mind exactly what they wanted as is indicated by the several not-so-common options furnished on this one range. These two stoves are slated for wood burning service in rural New England, and both were ordered by one family! Each of these desirable ranges are sure to be focal points of the home as they were a century ago!


Glenwood 108 C

Glenwood 108 C

The Glenwood 108 C was the most popular stove in New England around 1915. This one was found in an old horse barn in Southern Mass. by me . We bought the stove and as we loaded it we noticed a 1923 Ford touring car in the corner. Couldn't buy the car but I got the stove. This is a very nice example of this model and was as straight and complete as any I've found in quite a while. It is done except for installation of grates. You can choose from a wood only fire box which is about 22" long or a set of coal grates made for this model. The coal grates for the Glenwood C are amongst the best designed at the time. $2900


Planning For The Future

Planning  For The Future

This is my work bench with my latest batch of universal wood grates. there are about 100 under the bench. The government says there is little inflation. They need to go to my grocery store and buy some food. The cereal boxes look the same but are getting thinner and thinner even though the price remains the same. This is inflation and it seems to be accelerating. Many of my needed supplies are going up in price quickly with no end in sight.
To keep costs under control we are trying to buy ahead. Welding rod, stove cement, paint and grates are examples. By buying 100 grates at a time I will save money as prices continue to rise. This helps us keep prices lower for the consumer. Our customers tend to be folks that are concerned about the future and we need to have everything on hand to supply their needs.


Just out of the infirmary!

Just out of the infirmary!

Yet another US Army cannon heater! This model is a #18 and is the middle size. I think it would be prudent to clear up a few myths about these stoves. We have heard all kinds of B.S. about these stoves that range from civil war use to stoves that were used to heat cannons. All of that is hooey! These were used specifically to heat buildings like barracks and quonset huts and every other building the Armed Service used throughout most of the 20th century. They were made by several foundries under government contracts, and castings do have slightly different markings. They were made in size 15,18,and 20 and these numbers correspond to the size of the firepots. The term cannon heater IS NOT to be taken literally! The term stems from the fact that early cannons do slightly resemble the shape of the upper and lower firepots of this stove in a "Looney Tunes" kind of way, and simply define form rather than function. They were sold off en-mass as surplus from about the time of the Korean conflict right up until the early 1970's. Most greenhouses in New England had one or two to keep the chill off the plants, and one of these was depicted in some of Norman Rockwell's works. They are not rare, and are very effective heaters! That said, nothing is infinite in supply, so we do take the liberty of installing a refractory liner in these stoves so the firepot is not burned out over time. We do not have the convenience of ordering up a firepot from the Quartermaster! This stove burns wood or coal easily. $1800.00 WE DO STOCK GRATES AND INNER HEAT DEFLECTORS FOR THESE STOVES. Call with your needs.


Columbian Prize coal franklin

Columbian Prize coal franklin

Columbian Prize coal franklin

Before and after! We currently have a flock of these in stock. These are coal burning Franklin style stoves that were initially designed in the 1870's and refined over time. They are outstanding small coal stoves with ample heating ability and drop dead good looks that are indicative of the late Victorian era. These also have two porcelain tiles with various pictures of mythical individuals on them that augment the styling. Festooned with mica viewing windows,nickel plate, and ample filigree, they are sure show stoppers today just as they were over a century ago at the expo! $ 2700.00


Yet Another Glenwood SNJ has surfaced!

Yet Another Glenwood SNJ has surfaced!

WOW! Yet another Glenwood SNJ super capacity range has surfaced! This is the flagship gas range from Glenwood, and was the very best range that could be purchased at the time period. These were exceptionally expensive and thus were privy only to the ultra wealthy and elite. They also were launched just in time for the great stock market crash of 1929, and thus are very few and far between as people were worried. Only offered for two years and too expensive for the company to make profit, they were dropped from the line and the rest is history; the most desirable gas range ever to be made was born, briefly made, and jealously sought after ever since. This particular example has some interesting history of its own. It was removed from the famous Foxcatcher Farm estate which belonged to the scholar heir to the DuPont Chemical fortune John DuPont. You may remember hearing tales of the noted ornithologist eccentric who befriended Olympic wrestlers and set up a training compound on his property. He then slid into insanity gradually culminating with the murder of one of his students, ending with a search of the family mansion in which police had to turn off the furnaces to flush out the fugitive. This range was his personal stove, and its stature is in line with the types of individuals who were able to afford these ranges when new. Expensive range to buy and restore, but oh so worth it! Call for details.


Ideal Fairmount

Ideal Fairmount

Ideal Fairmount

Leonard and Baker Company made simple but very well designed stoves from 1905 till about 1938 or so. They are just everywhere. I just bought two identical stoves with gas side cars in a Victorian home in Boston. Both are the peach colored enamel with the gas side car and both are in fine condition. If you are looking for a year round stove you may want to call and talk to Brandon about these stoves. Both will be brought up to code with insulation, thermostat, safety system , etc. and will be fine long term stoves for your kitchen. They are as found in the photos. One has sold so one is left.


Grand Quaker: Electric or gas conversion customers read this!

Grand Quaker: Electric or gas conversion customers read this!

This a Grand Quaker from Taunton Iron Works. It was made around 1890 or so and was the most elaborate stove made by the company. It has all the filigree one would expect from a Victorian stove plus a Pie Puller to bring food to the front of the oven, and three drying racks that hide inside the high back when not in use. Also, all of the handles are people's faces. Notice the open wicker style base which accurately simulates a woven basket. I don't think we could cast that today. This is a great old stove , set up for wood only, and will be the center of attention in any home. It is missing the right hand end shelf so the price is reduced to $4200
PLEASE NOTE: We have two more of these stoves which will be combined to make one ultimate gas or electric conversion range. This two-for-one special will sell for $500.00 and includes delivery to the conversion facility. Call with questions in regard to this process. This is the exact stove that singer-songwriter Daryl Hall has in his own home!


Cottage Crawford Range

Cottage Crawford Range

Cottage Crawford Range

Cottage Crawford Range

Occasionally a stove will be linked to a descriptive word upon sight. This one seems to draw one toward the word "darling"! This range is the smallest (at only 45" total width) in a series of four scaled ranges that would cater to peoples individual household needs/size. These were referred to as the Cottage, Fortress, Castle, and Palace Crawford ranges, and all were identical in looks but of course different sizes. The cottage Crawford is a wonderfully petite range that has full size range characteristics! These include: a 24" firebox that is set up for wood fuel, convenient loading from the front to avoid smoke in the home when tending, and is combined with the low tea-shelf, and enormous cabinet style warming oven base. The two latter noted features are of particular importance. The low tea shelf was standard on this range and has historically been looked down upon. This however, has become a thing of the past as people are starting to prefer the look of a fine tiled wall behind their range or some other treatment like stainless steel or copper! The low tea shelf acts as a great place to keep food warm, while still showing off that great backdrop! In addition, this stove is equipped with a warming closet area in the base as well as a deep ash pit that prevents damage to the grates from ash build up. All in all, if you are looking for a fantastic small range (that acts like a big range) that is set up for wood, this is the range for you! In regard to the pictures, I am 5 ' 7" tall for scale. Notice the cavernous oven in a small range! (we have the oven rack and removed it for the picture) $ 2700.00 SOLD


Brookline wood/gas range

Brookline wood/gas range

Brookline wood/gas range

This is a Brookline stove designed to burn wood and gas. Brookline was a trade name used by the Boston Stove Company, a huge concern back in the day. They are illegal as found because they exhaust the combusted fumes of two fuels up the same flue. We remedy this problem by removing all the gas works from the oven when rebuilding the range. Now it has a wood only firebox that heats the entire stove including the oven. The propane gas burners on the surface are nice for summer use and also can be safely used while the stove is burning wood. These are very nice stoves for use where you want the heating and cooking of a wood range but don't want to light the stove for a quick meal. Anyone with an isolated rural dwelling will find this to be a great stove. A single propane bottle will run the cooktop for months. This one was in great shape when we got it and is now rebuilt . You can hardly see the flames on the gas burners because the stove is properly adjusted for the propane. We also rebuilt the pilot system on the surface so you can have automatic lighting if you choose, or turn it off to save fuel. $2800.00 SOLD


Finding old stoves

Finding old stoves

Finding old stoves

Finding old stoves

We are constantly told that antique stoves are very rare. Most are far more common than most folks think. Here are photos of my truck returning with three loads of stoves. The last photo is late April 2013 and is the first of perhaps three loads to be removed from one home. This first load is 5 pre 1900 ranges and about 4 parlor stoves. The middle photo is a Glenwood double oven range plus about half a ton of parts we found when the snow melted. The parlor stoves range from fairly recent to the mid 1800's. Antique stoves are rarely thrown out in New England and there are still many out there to be found.


The Romance of restoring old stoves.

The Romance of restoring old stoves.

Folks are always telling me about the romance of restoring stoves. Well here I am in the attic of a three decker in New Bedford on a day when most folks are at the beach. The temperature up here was very close to 100. The place was obviously the place to put anything that was unwanted or unneeded and was full of old clothes, toys, etc. The stove is near mint condition and I bought it. Then down three flights around corners and into the truck. We work pretty hard for some of our stoves but we also get to snoop around other folks stuff. We hauled two ranges this morning, and I did find a beautiful waterfowl print as well. Its not all greeting customers and counting money. It is very hard work when we would rather be doing something else, but it is all good in the end.


Going off the grid?

Going off the grid?

Going off the grid?

Going off the grid?

I have received many calls from folks planning to go off the grid. They want a wood/coal range for the winter and they want to do some cooking in the summer. The wood stoves tend to be too hot so it would be nice to have some gas burners. Above all they want to be free from electricity and usually fossil fuels. Many companies made the perfect range during the depression but they are illegal today. The reason why they are illegal is that they burn gas plus any other fuel in the oven and exhaust both up the same flue. Too bad as they were exceptionally well constructed stoves.

We have taken one of these stoves and removed all the gas fixtures from the oven. You end up with a 4 burner gas cook surface and a wood or coal fired range with oven. This is legal and should meet the needs of folks who plan to be self sufficient and off the grid. It is also perfect for people with a camp that is used occasionally.

The green one above is sold already but we will be getting some more in and setting them up in the same fashion. We completely disassemble, modify the oven to eliminate the gas fixtures and all the holes that came with the gas pipes etc. Then we carefully assemble the stove, rebuild the gas on the surface, add new grates and a firebox liner, and clean the stove from top to bottom. We do not put pilots on the surface burners so that you will not be burning any fuel when the stove is not in use. Customers tell me that a 20 pound grill bottle lasts for months. These came in various colors and we will try to find the color you want. We can set the stoves up to burn wood only or coal/wood. As of March 15 I have 5 in stock ready for restoration.

The tan stove is a smaller Glenwood Duplex that we took from a third floor apartment in Newport, RI. Serpentine narrow stairs and lots of fun. This stove will be restored to new with gas on the cook top and a new set of coal/wood grates in the firebox. This stove came from the company set up for kerosene and is in like new condition. If you are looking for a nice"off the grid" stove this may be it.




Glenwood Modern Home Grand 208

Glenwood Modern Home Grand 208

The 208 Modern Home Grand was the flagship range from Glenwood. The "modern" term refers to the second series of this range which reflected the public demand for less ornate decoration of ranges starting in about 1910. This is a massive range that combined all the best ideas from the Glenwood designers. This range can be set up for wood or coal depending on the customers wants/needs or a combination of both fuels. If you are a wood burner only, this stove has the largest firebox I have seen in a range at 25 inches long due to the exceedingly rare extension-box feature. If you are a coal burner, you can expect that this range will run overnight on a fresh load of good anthracite while not only doing all of your baking but also a good portion of your heating. A robust, powerful, long-lasting range that can easily bake for twelve people but is just as useful for less. This example just sold . Sorry.


Glenwood C

Glenwood C

glenwood stoves

This Glenwood C is a fine example of the most popular stove in New England for 20 years from 1914 till 1934 or so. Sturdy with a large firebox they make superb wood stoves and fine coal ranges as well. With wood they are fed from the front and have at least a 22 inch firebox. I have a flock of these in black,gray, tan, mint green, and some with sidecars as well. Completely restored to new condition these start at $2900 and up depending on options. I have just acquired this model with a gas sideshelf. Perfect for that camp or isolated home. SOLD I do have about 8 of these to be restored in stock


Triple Crawford

Triple Crawford

There have been only four triple Crawford ranges ever found and I found all four of them!!! Two have double ovens overhead and two have the earlier single oven. The single oven is quite large and has a broiler that drops out of the bottom. You place the food on it and push the button to bring the food up under the burner. Pretty high tech for 1917.

I have just found the forth one and it is in far better condition than the others that I have found. These were never designed for the average person, even the ads show people in minks and maids in high heels. These were for folks for whom only the best would do. If you are looking for a stove that is close to unique , enormous, and capable of cooking for large numbers this is one to look at. SOLD

These were designed to burn wood or coal on the left to heat the stove top and the lower oven. The gas side has 4 large burners plus a small simmer burner. Gas also powers the upper oven and the drop broiler. The ashes come out through the lower left door, and th lower right door is for warming. Very big,very substantial, very unique stoves. Originally this also had an internal gas fired water heater but I would suggest not using it today. Call Sorry, Sold


Cabinet Glenwood M

Cabinet Glenwood M

Before WW1 Glenwood produced huge numbers of stoves in a great many models. This is one of the Letter Stoves and filled a gap between the Glenwood E and the Glenwood K. It has the enormous firebox found in both plus the warming oven above and below. These are ranges designed with a large cook surface and oven yet they take up less space than many smaller ranges. The reason is that the ashes come out the front through the small door on the left. That eliminates the ashshelf etc. on the end of the stove. This stove is a little longer than 3 feet wide without the right shelf. Even with the shelf it is only about 42" yet it has a 24" wood firebox and a 20" oven. The cook surface is the exact same size as the larger Glenwood ranges. We just got in a Glenwood cabinet M with the roll oven. It is in good shape and will be a great stove with either wood or coal. These are hard to come by so speak if you want one. $3600 SOLD


Glenwood SNJ


WOOD GRATES

WOOD GRATES

For twenty years we restorers had trouble with wood grates for kitchen ranges. Some, like Glenwoods, were very flat and sagged in no time. Others were difficult to find and/or expensive to make. I finally built two match plates for wood grates. this is the smaller of the two and fits most all medium and small ranges. It is about 17 1/2" long and a little over 8 inches wide. Notice That it is designed with ribs running both side to side and lengthwize. These are now used by most dealers here in New England. We can easily weld tabs on the sides as needed or cut the length to the desired size. Then brick up the sides and you are set for many years. I have sold these for 10 years or so without anyone asking for a second set for the same stove. In fact, I sometimes buy stoves with the grates still in them from years ago. I also make a larger set ( 16 pounds) that fits perfectly in the Glenwood E and K models but over time we have found it also fits many other large ranges like the Home Grand, Model Home Herald etc. Available at $110 plus shipping.


Triple Crawford.

Triple Crawford.

Around WW1 Crawford began to produce the Victory Crawford wood/ gas combination ranges in two sizes, large and larger. They also produced an even larger stove called the Triple Crawford. They proved to be too large for most homes and were very expensive. The Triple line was dropped in the early Twenties. Here is a perfect example of the enormous range. Starting at the top it has two gas ovens. The left one has the first model Robert Shaw thermostat and the right has a drop broiler controlled by the nickel knob below the ovens. the cooktop has 6 lids for wood/coal, 5 burners for gas. the main body has the firebox on the left with a coal fired water heater, the main oven in the middle, and a storage area on the right that also could house a complicated gas fired water heater. Down below is the ashpit on the left plus storage on the right. The entire wood/coal side is controlled by a single knob that through rods controls everything. This is the king of the wood/gas ranges and grabs all the attention in the kitchen. SOLD.


Glenwood 208 C

Glenwood 208 C

Glenwood 208 C

Glenwood sold the first Glenwood C models around 1914. They soon updated the line with the 100 series and later updated again with the 200 series. This is a very late 208C with tan/buff enamel and the very hard to find warming oven in tan/buff with yellow backsplash. This one was rescued from a garage in Middletown, RI and has been carefully restored to almost new. There are a very few chips in the enamel( there always are), and some scuffing around the ashpit, but the overall condition of the enamel is exceptional. We have set the stove up with a pair of triangular grates for coal but it can also be used with wood. A very nice stove that will work for many years to come $3400. Note; there are some 300 series Glenwood C stoves around BUT they were not made by Glenwood. They were made under contract by the Stewart Foundry in Albany, NY. SOLD





in restoration, coming soon

in restoration, coming soon


Glenwood 8K

Glenwood 8K

About 1910 or so Glenwood introduced the Glenwood K model. These are large ranges with a huge rectangular oven and a substantial firebox. This one takes a 24" long stick from the front and is designed for daily use throughout the year. These were the " meat and potato" stoves from Glenwood. They were very popular with folks that had a large kitchen and lots of room for the heat to travel. I have about 6 right now. Some are tan enamel and some are black but all are exceptional ranges. They can be set up for wood only, a combination wood/coal or for mostly coal. The wood only option has a much larger firebox than the others. $2900.


Charm Crawford Royal 8-20

Charm Crawford Royal 8-20

Charm Crawford Royal 8-20

Here is one of the most popular of the Crawfords with the very hard to find Warming oven. I heated my home for several years with a Charm Crawford and they are superb with either wood or coal. Crawford was one of the leaders in the stove industry back when this was made. This particular one came originally from a homestead in North Berwick, Maine but has spent the last 20 years or so in dry storage. No cracks or breaks can be found in this stove. A great example of an excellent stove. The picture below is the completed range.



Glenwood SNJ supercapacity range

Glenwood SNJ supercapacity range

Glenwood SNJ supercapacity range. This one is in my kitchen and not for sale at any price. I also have another for my son. They have the best insulation sealed inside the stove walls where you cannot disturb it. They have the best thermostat and it is completely ajustable for different gases with just a screw driver an a small wrench. The doors open to the side so there is never an issue with springs etc. They have six burners on the surface and three small warmers above,two broilers(one horizontal, and one vertical), Three ovens plus the warming oven above. Glenwood pulled out all the stops when they built this model and many consider it to be the best stove ever made.


Palace Crawford with roll oven

Palace Crawford with roll oven

Shortly after the turn of the century (1900) Walker and Pratt began producing a line of elegant stoves with the storage area in the base. The first and largest was the Palace model. Later the Castle, Fortress, and Cottage models came along. They were made till WW1 or so. This is the large Palace with the very hard to find Warming oven. It is set up for coal as a primary fuel and comes with a summer plate that drops into the firebox so wood can be efficiently burned when the stove is not going to be used continuously. The ashpan is in the base so that heat is not reflected back onto the grates. It also has a lazy susan in the oven so large pans of food can be easily rotated for even cooking. This is a rare stove today and the only one I have ever had. If you are looking for victorian elegance, tons of heat, and the very best of the Crawford line, this could be your stove. SOLD


Round Oak E20

Round Oak E20

This is the E series Round Oak in the large 20" size. It is set up for wood only with an original wood bottom from Round Oak. These are powerfulwood heaters that are beautiful besides. Made from about 1905-1909 theseare getting hard to find. This one has the side exhaust found only onstoves sold here in New England and is available at $2800 SOLD. I do have several D!* and E!* stoves. One with the extension can on top.


Glenwood Ourway Range

Glenwood Ourway Range

Just in. We have a Glenwood Ourway range with the oven on the right. It is in pretty good conditionwith the exception of a ding on the hood over the burners but I have a NOS one to replace the dinged one. We also have an Insulated Crescent left roll oven range in stock. These are actually Glenwoods but marketed by H. N. Clark with their name on the door. This is one of the best condition ranges I have ever seen. It could not have been used much in it's 85 year life. GONE


Glenwood 407 B

Glenwood 407 B

This range was born in the 1890's and set up to burn wood only. It was restored by me some years ago and loved by it's owner. The owner has decided on a larger Coal kitchen range and traded this stove in. It is in wonderful condition , as is, but will be carefully redone as needed .The B model in the Glenwood line was one of the more deluxe models and towards the higher end of the price range. Sold. I have several more similar early B ranges in the barn.


A word on Show Business

We here at the Stove Hospital are called on quite often by prop houses and production companies for period stoves and some furnishings for their kitchen and heating stove scenes. We do have a huge selection of stoves for both cooking and heating that we can rent and or outright sell to prop houses etc. for whatever project you have going on. Prices are greatly reduced in many cases as the stoves are being purchased "as-found as-is" for cosmetic work to be done on premises of the movie lot. Call us to discuss your needs or your current project.


Fortress Crawford 8-20

Fortress Crawford 8-20

These are very unique stoves with wings on both sides and the ashpit way down in the base. They are excellent coal ranges and are pretty good with wood as well. I used one for many years and my wife has suggested I put another one in the kitchen now. Having the ashpit so far away from the grates help preserve the grates and in 10 years I never had to replace mine. The stove also heated the entire home with little maintainance. A great stove for the serious coal person. $2800


Glenwood Home Grand #8

Glenwood Home Grand #8

Just finished. A Glenwood #8 Home Grand. these were made from 1898 till 1902 or so and are very hard to find today. This one was in my kitchen but will now be going to Penn. where it will be used with coal to heat a very large area. Great stoves and just plain beautiful. Sorry, SOLD


Summer stuff

Summer stuff

What do you do when you are not doing stoves? Well, we have a garden, for one thing. We live on the old Rhode Island Red farm where they raised the hens for a hundred years or so. That plus cow manure and lime is all you need to grow great squash, pumpkins, cukes and tomatos. Here is a photo of last year's cherry tomato plants in late August. How can you not garden when you have soil like this.


Model Grand World’s Fair range

Model Grand World’s Fair range

Just finished--a Model Grand World's Fair range with the rare high back with cherubs. One of the most impressive ranges ever made.This is the very late 1900 series.SOLD.


Spicer

Spicer

This stove is on loan to a museum. Not for sale


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Where “good enough” is NOT good enough!

About Antique Stove Hospital

Wood and coal stoves returned to day one condition. All stoves are totally disassembled, cleaned, parts welded or replaced as needed, caulked, reassembled, painted, new grates installed and nickel replaced. Our stoves are rebuilt one at a time from good original stoves and guaranteed to operate as they were designed. Kitchen ranges and parlor stoves are available. We carry 1850 to 1930 stoves of these types.

Wood/gas combination ranges were the top of each manufacturer's line. They combined the advantages of both the wood/coal winter range and the gas fired summer range. We restore the solid fuel fireboxes to either wood or coal. The gas fixtures are completely rebuilt for propane or natural gas depending upon the planned use of the stove. Gas ovens and broilers are insulated if needed and thermostats and safeties are added to the unit.

We are not a large operation that is restoring stoves on an assembly line. Each stove is personally attended to by Mr. Pineo and will not leave the shop until it is ready. We do not sell stoves as decorations or curios but for everyday use in your home. I am not a broker. With the exception of castings and nickel plating, all work is done here at the hospital. Some dealers subcontract work to other dealers. We do not do this.

We maintain an inventory of about 200 stoves at all times. Call and we can discuss your wishes and the availability of the stoves. I prefer not to accept deposits on sales, but rather ask for payment when you are happy with the stove.

Emery Pineo "Paleostoveologist " and "Stove whisperer"


Information

THOSE SEEKING RESTORATION SERVICES PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING NEW INFORMATION!!!

- Due to the HUGE AND OVERWHELMING DEMAND for restoration and rebuilding services, The Stove Hospital is NOT ACCEPTING ANY FURTHER WORK UNTIL AT LEAST THE NEW YEAR (end of 2014) OR FURTHER NOTICE. Do feel free to contact us in regard to your needs for parts and or information on your stove, or to schedule restoration for your future needs. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Changes in business; People used to come in and buy stoves for occasional use and nostalgia. No more! I'm seeing folks that realize that some winter there will be a shortage of fuel and lots of cold people. They are preparing by having a coal/wood range or a parlor stove. Both run on fuels that are available locally and can be stored. Coal can be bought years ahead and stored in the cellar(I buy mine in July , in plastic 40 pound bags on a pallet.I'm still using some that I bought several years ago). When we loose power I often don't know till morning when I try to brush my teeth.--no water!! Most modern stoves use electricity, or worse --a manufactured product like pellets! This year many dealers got their pellet supply in March--almost spring!! I like my winter fuel supply where I can see it.



My wood and coal restoration has reached the point where I will be doing mostly the coal/wood end of the business and less in the gas area. We send most of our gas work out to a man who specializes in that work only.

Our business has expanded greatly this year. Let's face it, things are pretty uncertain right now. I am currently swamped with folks that are worried about winter heating and the availability of various fossil fuels. My son who originally took a year off from teaching in order to help here, is now full time. If you are thinking of a wood/coal range or heater, please do not wait till the last minute. Order early if you plan to use a stove this winter. We will do our best to meet everyone's needs.



Also;

1. I've turned sixty nine and I have started to bury my friends. My very best friend of forty years died on election day. Two others in the month before or after.

2. My insurance has taken a quantum leap that means , in effect, I would be working to support them. I now know why they own the large buildings like the Prudential Center

3. These stoves seem to be getting heavier. I need help now to haul even the smaller ranges up a flight of stairs.

4. Time is much more important than money right now . Someone else is catching the fish, I have cars to restore, dogs to walk, and sunsets to be viewed.



You will see that many of the stoves on this site are sold. I do have around 250 right now in stock and we are restoring as fast as possible but cannot catch up. Folks have realized that a wood range may be very important one of these days and are buying now. If you see one you like you can order now and pick it up when it is done. Deposits; We do not take deposits. You tell us what stove you want, we restore it, then you decide if you like the stove. If you do not like the stove you are free to walk away.

BEWARE OF "FRANKENSTOVES". More and more lately we have been encountering stoves where a dealer has taken a body from one manufacturer and added shelves or other parts from another manufacturer. Some such arrangements may consist of a warming oven of unknown origin, or legs that sort-of...maybe fit etc. We believe that you came in to buy a restored genuine complete antique stove and we will not sell you a stove that has mismatched parts. These are antiques and not getting any younger. As a buyer in the market for a stove you must protect your investment by getting a quality restoration of an original whole stove. If you don't buy here, be sure to ask/ investigate!


Shipping:

I do ship stoves all over the country. I am forced to charge for crating as it takes time and pallets, particle board, ,a trip to Home Depot, etc. Recently I have developed a relationship with a broker that has allowed me to get discounts in the 70% range. The trick is that I must pay up front to get the discount. I usually crate the stove, get the price, then have you pay by credit card before pickup. The difference is enormous. A $1000 shipping charge will be more like $200. Delivery to your home by liftgate can also be arranged if you wish.


Stove Availablility

We are often asked if the stove in the photo is the one for sale. We do not show one photo and deliver another stove like some shops. The stove in the photo is the exact one you will receive. Some dealers use a filed photo and deliver another example or a similar stove to the customer. We will not do that. Many of my stoves say SOLD on the website. That means that that particular stove is sold, however we may have several others of the same make and model available. An example would be a Glenwood C. We usually have 8-10 around at all times, but we would rather send you photos of the exact stove we have to restore for you before you decide on a stove. We are trying to be completely honest about the stove you buy. It is a big investment so take your time, as you will have to look at it for many years!


Business changes

If you think things are fine in the USA, you better think again
1. My supplier of firebrick just closed after a lifetime of service.
2. My supplier of sand blast materials just closed after being in business since 1837!
3. My good nickel welding rod has been discontinued as it was too expensive to make.
4. My nickel plater has closed and moved and is no where near up to speed.
5. Every item I buy to work on stoves is getting more expensive at an accelerating rate.
Everything is not OK. Best to get prpared as it looks like trouble is headed our way


Antique Gas Valves

We have been getting lots of calls from folks with gas valve problems. The valves on antique gas stoves NEVER wear out. The proprietary sealant inside them does get old and dries out after 50-60 years. They get hard to turn or you can smell gas leaking from them. You do not need to discard the valves and replace them. We can rebuild these old valves and make them like new.
Call and talk to Brandon if interested.


Coal versus wood in ranges.

I own a 7 acre wood lot but I burn coal. In places where wood is plentiful like Maine, wood makes lots of sense. In my area I have a choice and have tried both. Coal in a rebuilt range will burn for 8 - 12 hours at a time without any tending. There is no dust or odor if you are using it properly. It does take practice but once mastered is great to use. There is no danger of a chimney fire with coal. If you just light the stove for cooking or special occasions then wood is your best bet but if you heat full time think a little about coal .


NEW SERVICES

1. Glenwood thermometers come in two types. The early and the late ones. The late ones always work and the early examples usually don't. Reproduction thermometers are a poor replacement for an original, and usually come from China. My son has developed a method of rebuilding early Glenwood thermometers. It does require that the original be complete, but if it is, it can usually be made to run like it did one hundred years ago. It is a long, complicated process but will cure the problem forever. Call and ask for Brandon about this service.

2. Stove lessons. If you buy a stove from us , we will gladly hook it up in our showroom and teach you how to run it. We do charge a small fee for this since we need to do set up, get stove pipe, fuel, etc. It is a fine way to eliminate most of the questions folks have when they get home and actually plan to use the stove. Bring some "fixins" and try cooking on your new stove. If you do not buy a stove from us we will charge $75 for the service.

3. Video disks. We are currently working on making CD's available on how to run various stoves such as: base heaters, upright coal stoves, ranges, oak stoves, and others will be available.


A diamond in the rough!

A diamond in the rough!

Just in; a second series 6 burner Glenwood double oven range. This stove looks deplorable at the moment, however it has "good bones" and you must have vision! The methods used to apply the white porcelain to cast iron after 1930 on Glenwood ranges is quite susceptible to failure. Almost 100% of the white stoves from this time period must have the porcelain removed as it is in such poor condition. This is no exception! As you can see, there were numerous attempts to match and recover the porcelain with cheap paints which invariably over time yellow with age making the stove look shabby. This range will have the white porcelain applied to the cast iron parts removed and those will be furnished in black and nickel plate. Those parts consist of the front facade of the stove, the door surrounds, door handles, and the trim strips above. We will be able to save all of the white sheet metal panels including those in the center of each door panel and all of the walls around the cook top. What the end result will be is a splendid looking 6 burner double oven range with broiler and warming closet trimmed with nickel plate! The bonus of this model is that it retains the swing-to-the-side doors with no springs, it has the accurate Robertshaw thermostats, the great insulation, and it is not as large/heavy as the earlier 1000 pound six burner while still retaining the good looks and large capacity in a smaller space. Priced to sell less than usual as there will be a costly restoration. This is a great way to get a six burner stove of your dreams with the same capacity of the larger earlier SNJ model for about half the cost. $ 800.00


Buying Your Own Stove.

Be careful! I paid way too much for the first few stoves that I bought. Now I often walk away and pass the stove by. Here are some good things to keep in mind when buying a stove.
1. Stoves on Ebay and Craigslist are usually MULTIPLES of the actual value. I often see stoves advertised for more than we sell them for when they are restored.
2. Most stoves are not "rare". Maybe you haven't seen any like it but we have. When you start looking you would be surprised at the number of ranges around. Many just have not been looked at in years.
3. Not all old stoves are expensive or even desirable. Many are in such poor shape that they are really best used for parts for other stoves. Some will need so many parts that they can't be realistically restored for a reasonable price.
4. Some are just illegal and of little value. Gas/wood ranges with one oven usually fit this category.
5. Some are rare. That can be a problem. If you need parts they may not be available. That lowers the value of the stove.
6. Some are just for museum pieces or decorations. They have to be bought at a value that will let you just set them aside to look at.
7. If you pay too much, you will actually spend more in the long run than if you came in and just bought a stove from a restorer.
8. Do not use a stove without it being rebuilt. I have only seen 2 or 3 that did not need a rebuild and that includes new old stock stoves that were never sold.
9. FRANKENSTOVES! This is a stove that is made by combining pieces from other, usually unrelated stoves. When you buy an antique stove you should expect to get the whole stove and not a base from one company, a body from another company, and a back made by someone else. Some dealers do this. Look the stove over well to make sure the parts are marked from the same manufacturer. An antique stove can be an investment , but not if it is a conglomeration of parts from other stoves.

We usually pay from nothing to about $300 for ranges. Some are more but they have to be very good, very unusual, or something we have an order for. When you buy you need to figure in the cost of restoration. Nickel can run to $600 or so, a rebuild can run $1500 to do it correctly, Grates can run to $3-400. Are any parts missing? They need to be found and paid for. That can run into real money.


Words can not describe this stove!

Words can not describe this stove!

Words can not describe this stove!

Once in a while we come across a stove that is so outlandish and bizarre and so overpoweringly large that words can not do it justice. This is the case with the above stove. This is a "French style" range sold by Bramhall Deane Co. of New York, New York. In the 1890's before things like income tax were instilled upon us, there were some extremely wealthy individuals living around NYC and surrounding islands. These people were quite world-wise and most of them were fascinated with all things involving Paris, France. One of the things that was a must-have for the "super wealthy" of the day was a French kitchen. These kitchens were set up on a HUGE scale (often underground) and included everything from large copper pots/racks, walk in safes for the silver service, many servants of various class, and of course a centerpiece range. Stoves of this stature could only be procured by three means at the time. The first was to buy one in France and have it shipped over to the USA. The second was to visit the showroom of Duparquet-Houte and Monuese in Manhattan, and purchase one of their ranges, and the third was to order from Bramhall Deane and Co. of which this is an example. This stove came from an estate on Long Island NY, and some of the features of the home were 19 bathrooms, grand wrap-around staircases with illuminated Tiffany glass dome, vaulted ceiling ball room, and of course, a gentleman's smoking library! This range stands over 9 feet high and has a central firebox with two flanking 28 inch deep ovens capable for cooking for 72 people. There are two warming shelves above the cook surface, and an attached grand ventilating hood with electric lights! This stove is so vast that it has a factory-installed glass window in the side of the hood just so apprentices could watch what the Head Chef was doing. Owned originally by a member of the Goddard family of yacht racing fame, whom also was the first female allowed to race in the America's Cup! This stove can be furnished on several different levels. This can be sold as-is for an historic placement as in a museum, or it can be sold with conversion in mind for either gas or electric use (solid fuel not recommended for this range). However this range goes out the door, it is going to be a grand statement, and a super rare range that will turn heads! Only two of these ranges have ever surfaced for sale among all of the New England stove dealers. This is the only all intact example found by Bramhall Deane. Price on application. and will depend on customer wishes for restoration. (Unique and Expensive) SORRY, SOLD


Planning to visit?

Planning to visit?

Ptolemy has passed away. He lost his battle with lymph cancer on November14, 2008. He did his best with the help of Doctor Mutty( real name). The world is a little less fun without him.

This is Ptolemy, my director of security at the hospital and he is friendly without mercy. His favorite things are exploring the woods, the drive thru at Burger King, and greeting visitors. If you have a friendly dog, Ptolemy will show him/her the very best places to play and probably get wet. The hospital is a working shop and you should not overdress for a visit. Fall and Spring are sometimes muddy. It is also good to call ahead as I have been known to occasionally leave for business reasons or bass fishing. Looking forward to seeing you.


Magellan

Magellan

Ptolemy is training a security assistant named Magellan. Just twelve weeks old in this photo he promises to be a large golden in a few months.


What’s new

What’s new

What’s new

Our nickel plating shop has moved. The problem is not that they moved but that they closed in July and they are still not open in October. I have gone door to door in the Rhode Island area looking for a plater that can meet our needs. We need quality, reasonable prices, and good turn around time. I have been unsuccessful. One shop was triple the current cost and another produced horrid work. Hopefully my shop will be back in action soon. Until then we will try to complete any work that does not require plating and partially finish other stoves in hopes of our nickel shop getting up to speed soon.

Since we had no plating coming in we addressed another problem. When we finish a stove it sits around the shop and gets dirty again. The cure was to have a place to put stoves that was dust free. We have spent the last few weeks building a showroom for the stoves. It is modeled after train stations from the teens and twenties with all period furniture and fixtures. Now customers don't need to pass through our dirty, noisy shop to look at completed stoves. Here are a couple photos of the room as it is today.

Nov. 29. Our nickel shop is open again!!!!


Security Staff

Security Staff

My security staff hard at work protecting the stove hospital from squirrels. What better way to spend a cold snowy afternoon? Incidentally, at the sight of a squirrel they turn into velocigoldens. 4 down so far this season and one skunk!!


Shep

Shep

This is Shep. He is a rescue dog that was scheduled to be put to sleep shortly after we saw him. He was skinny and had been abused badly but has finally struck gold. My son and his wife have adopted him and he is fitting in well here at the Stove Hospital. Magellan has become a big friend and part time jungle gym. Here he is resting between attacks on Magellan. If you drop by he will probably be here to help greet you.


Railroad King #12

Railroad King #12

Here is the smallest of the Railroad King stoves. This one was originally placed in the station masters office at the Revere , Mass.RR station. He retired in 1949 and the stove left with him and sat, unused, in his living room till 2013. He has long ago passed and his daughter sold us the stove. Here it is all redone and ready to go. These are fine stoves with coal and are a great old railroad item. (NOTE: We tried this stove in our own facility showroom to experience how it ran on coal. We are very pleased to say that we were amazed at the heat that comes from this stove regardless of its small size! It is more than capable of heating a small to medium sized home when burning coal, and it burns for about 11 hours between fills of fuel! The heat exchanger baffles in the round top make for a very efficient burner!) $1600 SOLD


BASE HEATER

BASE HEATER

BASE HEATER

This is a Wing's Best Base Heater from Leonard and Baker. These are exceptionally powerful coal stoves but also burn wood as well. Most of the base heaters produced came from plants on South Water St. in Taunton, Mass. This is one of them. Leonard and Baker would put your name on a stove if you bought enough of them. Wing's was a ship's chandler in New Bedford during the whaling days and later became a very popular department store. They sold loads of these base heater over the years and they are among the best coal stoves ever made. I like them better than the more common Glenwood as the Wing's has a very strong bottom pan and unlike the Glenwood, the bottoms never give any trouble. I use a similar stove to heat my home all winter and they are a joy to use. If you want a powerful heater and you burn coal you may want to consider a Wing's. $2900 SOLD I have more in stock


Just a word about ranges.

When they were originally sold, you purchased the base range which was the base and the body. Then you added options till you arrived at the stove that met your needs. These options included the gas side car (left or right or both), gas side shelves, overhead gas ovens, water tanks, internal water heaters of several different types, a choice of 6 or 8 different grates, through the floor chutes for ashes, cabinet bases, colors, warming ovens (above and below the range), kerosene set up, left or right firebox, and many more choices. If you can think of it---somebody built it. Sometimes we have a difficult time finding some configurations as they may have been very unpopular at the time of manufacture or proved to be less durable than other choices. If you have something in mind I will try to find it for you.


In New England many folks never throw things out.

In New England many folks never throw things out.

In New England many folks never throw things out.

This garage is one example of someone that could not part with the old stoves. Over the years it developed into a small collection of stoves. The place is now sold so they had to go. This is the third such garage I have been in this year. Two truckloads came from here to my barn. They will all be restored and put back into use.


wood/gas combination ranges

Many of the combination ranges are illegal today. Call with a description BEFORE you buy one and we can help you determine if it is one that can be serviced, or if it is best left where it is now! THIS CAN SAVE YOU LOTS OF TIME, MONEY, AND GRIEF!


Unique Stoves

Unique Stoves

Unique Stoves

Unique Stoves

Barstow coal recirculator 1851, Chilson Trio stove 1851, Lowe Art Tile stove 1880's

These are both odd ball stoves from the 1850's. I collect stoves that are old enough that they will never be called on for heat again. Many of these are close to unique and all of them reflect the best thinking of their time. These were the high tech implements of the past and should be saved. I have perhaps 100 or so and I will continue to collect, repair, and store them. My son, the history teacher, takes a new stove each week to his schoolroom and displays the best ironwork of each era.

Eventually they will go into some museum for future generations to appreciate. If you have a strange old stove that is probably too old for use. I would like to know about it. I do not sell these but will eventually donate them somewhere where they will be safe.


UL Listing

Many times an inspector will say a stove must be UL listed. This rule only applies to stove manufactured since Jan. 1, 1981. Any stove made before that time is grandfathered but must be looked over for damage etc. The rules are found under the BOCA codes or the ASME codes, " solid fuel room heaters" in the exemption section at the end.


Why New England Stoves?

We prefer stoves made in this area for several reasons. One is that many stoves manufactured in the mid-west are part sheet metal and part cast iron. The pieces are riveted together and a rebuild requires drilling out all the rivets, removing lots of asbestos sheets, and putting all new rivets in when assembling the stove. The parts that wear are usually buried under the oven or in the back. I would rather eat a worm. Stoves in this area are plentiful and come apart easily. We can disassemble, replace parts etc., and reassemble without worrying about whether the parts will fit or not. If we have defective parts, they can be replaced or recast as needed. You end up with a better product.


Here is how we rebuild

Here is how we rebuild

This is an example of a Glenwood 508E range that spent many years in a barn and at least two or three outdoors. It looks to be complete with no breaks but it needs a complete rebuild.


Rebuilding Services

What is involved in properly rebuilding a kitchen range?
I have seen many examples of shoddy work in what was supposed to be a rebuilt range. Examples include just taking the cook surface off and sandblasting the stove whole to just a good washing with detergent.


RUST JACKING

RUST JACKING

RUST JACKING

This is my son's name for what kills old stoves. There is caulking in the joints of the stoves. Over the years the stove heats and cools many times plus it sits around all summer and gets damp every day.

When the stove heats up, the metal expands and any loose caulking or rust tends to slide downward in the joints. That puts pressure on the lower corners of the stove. Dampness adds more rust and the rust grows and
expands. eventually it breaks the corner brackets and panels begin to move around which breaks more tabs. In the end the stove falls apart in a heap.

Rustjacking is one reason why a rebuild is so important.

1. We disassemble to the last nut and bolt. Everything needs to come apart so we can inspect all the parts and replace missing or badly damaged parts.

Most dealers don't do this but claim they do.


Notice that even the base has been broken down. I do this so I can paint the inside of the legs where they touch the side rails. If I don't do this there is a chance that rust could form in the joint and travel under the paint. It isn't that bad for the stove but it is ugly.

2. It is at this point that I usually find a number of cracks , broken pieces , or worse yet, something that was fixed years ago by that uncle that knows everything. I usually end up unrestoring these parts before I continue.



3. Everything goes into the sandblast room and is sorted and set on the blast table. I use a system that recirculates the sand so I use it several times. It breaks down into finer particles and actually works better after it has been used a couple times.

4. After blasting , any broken parts go to the welding area and are welded, fishplated, or both. I also usually need to replace corner brackets by welding or fabricating new
ones. Certain models seem to break in certain places so I try to reinforce these points. Lids often need to be welded because they leak around the lifter holes.

5. The stove parts are painted in some cases. The front frame needs to be painted now so I don't paint the inside of the oven later. I like to paint the oven walls before assembly. They are coated with a 1200 degree silver paint that makes it easy to see the food in the oven. Painting while the stove is apart assures that there will be no overspray in the oven.

6. The entire stove is assembled in the assembly area , painted (3 coats), and closely inspected

7. The firebox is put in place. This can be a wood bottom, coal/ wood grate, or coal only bars. New grates can be found, but my foundry work is done in Wisconsin. They do great work but I have to pay shipping both ways plus the cost of the work. We then line the box with refractory material appropriate to the application.

8. The ash pan is built to fit the stove. The thermometer is fixed or replaced

9. Nickel is replaced on the stove. I have a very good shop. Not cheap, just good. A kitchen range will run from about $300 up depending on the complexity of the nickel for that model. The price also seems to vary with golf scores, wind direction etc.


Some notes on these stoves

Some notes on these stoves

One of the reasons stoves wear out is not that they are used each winter but that they are not used each summer. In summer the house gets warm during the day. At night cool air falls down the chimney and moisture condenses inside the stove. This water mixes with the ash and forms harmful chemicals which eat the iron from the inside out. Stoves with water tanks are often paper thin around the tank. Be very careful when purchasing these stoves. It is best to disconnect the stove from the flue in summer to eliminate the problem.

We paint our stoves with a high quality stove paint. Rust has never been a problem for us. One way to eliminate the problem is to rub a small amount of cooking oil into the cook surface in spring. Just put some on a rag. Get rid of the rag right away. The stove will smoke some in the fall the first time it is lit but it will soon go away.

Sometimes some of the stove cement will stain the stove around joints. I take some cooking oil on my finger and rub it into the area. In ten minutes the stain goes away and never comes back. I have no idea why.

Most stoves advertised online like Craigslist or ebay are overpriced. I cannot buy these, fix them , and break even. Everyone thinks they have the only one around. Too much Antiques Road Show and American Pickers. If you cannot sell your stove it is priced too high. If you want to buy a stove, don't be afraid to walk away from a deal that seems wrong. I do all the time.

When looking at a stove check the corners, get a flashlight and look around in the oven, in back, and underneath. Especially check the wall between the firebox and the oven and the corners. Can the stove be fixed or do you need to find another like it to get one good one? Keep in mind the cost of restoration. Nickel runs $300 UP for a range, Welding rod is $77 per pound, paint is not cheap and I buy it by the several case lot. Sandblasting is quite a project. Don't forget grates. A new set from a foundry(if you have the original patterns) can run between $200-$300. The firebox liner will run $50 or so. Add it up before you buy and find out it's too expensive. Most antique ranges can be purchased for under $300. Do not buy wood/ gas combos without checking. Most are illegal today.

Let's say you find a model T Ford in a barn. Would you drag it home, pour gas in it, and start to commute to work with it the next day. No! But people try it all the time with stoves. You cannot just connect a stove and start using it. Here are some of the problems;

1. Does it have grates? If not you need to find a set. Some folks use thick steel plates in the box. They expand more than iron and will crack the box. Can you drop wood down in the ashpit? Yes you can but it will blow a hole in the oven wall before long. The folks that designed these stoves knew what they were doing and you should do your best to get the stove back to what it was in the beginning. The autos today are pretty dependable after 110 years or development. The wood/coal stove industry in the USA started in 1627 and lasted till WW2 or so---over 300 years. They got it right!!

2. "My friend says If you burn wood you don't need a liner in the firepot." I hear that all the time and it is wrong. I also get calls all the time from people wanting a new firepot. Don't listen to the oldtimer that tells you bunk like this. We have liners for almost everything. A firepot with a proper liner is good for a century or two. firepots are expensive because so many people have used them without liners.

3. The stove is just like new and ready to use. NO!!! We bought out a building full of new old stock ranges from the 1930's. They were still crated and every one needed a rebuild. The caulking in the joints breaks down, the joints develop rust, the joints fill with smoke and particulates, and the corners are under great pressure. A rebuild puts everything back to day one and the stove will last a lifetime.

4. The stove gives off a ton of heat, it even gets red. OUCH! The stove should NEVER get red. If it does, it is overheated and will warp, crack, self destroy, etc. The stove is leaking air, or you need a damper, or you need a liner etc.

5. Dampers, I keep hearing that you need no damper or a barometric damper. Both are wrong. If you have no damper you will just send the heat up the flue and kill the caribou. Do not confuse the controls on the stove for dampers. They are draft controls or controls for direct or indirect draft. You do need a damper in the first section of pipe above the stove. Some modern installers insist on a barometric damper. They are OK with modern stoves but will kill any chance of heat from an antique. Go to the hardware store and buy a plain old fashioned damper. They work.

Till the advent of oil folks had these and nothing else. They long ago perfected the coal and wood stoves of their day. Coal burning technology peaked around 1910 and went down hill because of cheap oil and central heating. Don't try to out think what they did. Better to use their ideas and enjoy the stove and the heat


Household Base Heater #6

Household Base  Heater #6

The photo doen't really show the size of this stove. These are serous heaters for use with wood or coal. This one came from a garden shed here in RI where it sat for many years. The owner planned to rebuild it himself but since then has had to live with an oxygen bottle. No flames allowed in the home nowadays. This was a good solid original and has been rebuilt with new grates , liners , etc. Ready to go and do some serious heating $2900 SOLD


Village Crawford Royal

Village Crawford Royal

Village Crawford Royal

Village Crawford Royal 8-20. This is one of my personal favorites. I had one in my kitchen for several years. This one is set up for wood only and feeds from the top or from the front. About 10 years ago my son and I were in a "junk barn" in Searsport, Maine. He found tucked under a bench a new old stock Village crawford firebox extender. I have had several made and one is on this stove which gives it a firebox length of 23". Very large for a medium size stove. The oven is the 20" model and this is just a great stove. $2700 SOLD I have several more in this model


Glenwood 308 Home grand with warming oven.

Glenwood 308 Home grand with warming oven.

Glenwood 308 Home grand with warming oven.

Glenwood 308 Home grand with warming oven.

In 35 years of collecting and restoring stoves I have never had a chance to pick up a Glenwood Home Grand with the warming oven. They are just very rare. The stove was the top of the Glenwood line and the double mantle back was very impressive. The warming oven was infrequently ordered and are exceptionally rare today. This one was put in a dry cellar around 60 years ago and just came to light last week. IT has lots of dust and assorted crud on it but it will clean up beautifully. The stove is complete, not broken up, and not pitted as many are. This is an exceptional example of a rare stove that I have never had a chance at before. I would like to set this one up for coal or wood burning. I used a similar stove without the warming oven but removed it because it made the house too hot. Don't let the photo trick you. The stove is 56" long and very subtantially built. If you have the need for a great stove and lots of heat, this may be the ticket. $3900

SOLD


Magee kitchener

Magee kitchener

Magee kitchener. Believe it or not, this is the small kitchener. Magee also made a HOTEL model of the kitchener and I have the only one of these currently known. It has 10 lids rather than 8 and is simply enormous. When we purchased the stove we had to remove two windows and a wall under the windows to get the stove out of the building. If you are looking for a unique, very large stove to convert to gas/electric you may want to look at the hotel kitchener from Magee. It looks similar to this one but is about a foot wider. Both are sold.


Glenwood 508E

Glenwood 508E

Just completed. A rare 508E with the very early roll warming oven. These are very hard to find and it has been years since one came in. The later stoves have a sheet metal warming oven which is nice but this cast iron version is better. This one has been set up for a combination of wood and coal burning as needed. Ready to go for many years. Sorry, SOLD


Cast Iron Cookware

Cast Iron Cookware

Many people call looking for cookware. I have lots of it but I like to have it around and I rarely sell any of it. We have a friend called The Maine Pan Man who has an inventory of several thousand pieces at any one time. If you are looking for any cast iron, either the usual, or the very rare, I would try the Pan Man. Loren Shuck (1-207-713-8123) or (JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


What’s Coming Soon?

What’s Coming Soon?

Here is a photo of the back of my truck. We can see that everyone will want to abandon oil as a heat source this coming winter and are laying in a supply of stoves that we believe folks will need. This is one day's worth. We will continue to buy as many as we can buy reasonably while the weather is warm. I think this fall we will simply be out straight and unable to leave to get stoves. In this load are a perfect #16 Railway King, a Perfect #18 cannon heater, a Cherub Glenwood wood parlor, and a superb Grand Glenwood Parlor stove.


Welding Cast iron stoves

The welding rod that we use for cast iron is 99% nickel and runs around $77.00 per pound. I am hearing from some folks that you can use regular 6011 rod to weld cast iron. It costs a dollar or two per pound. I agree that you can do this and the welds look good. However, The cheap rod expands differently than cast iron and once the stove is used a few times a new crack will develop next to the weld and follow the path of the old crack. We have several here for repair because of this. We will continue to use the expensive rod as we have had no problems with it and have been called on to repair many welds made by the cheaper rod. When looking for a restorer this is one of the invisible things that can make a huge difference down the road.


Base heaters

Base heaters

Base heaters came in around 1905 and were produced by several firms in Taunton, Mass. The smoke travels up the main body, down the back pipe,under the ashpit, back up the back pipe , then out of the stove. It may travel 10 to 12 feet inside the stove so that a maximum amount of heat is transferred to the room. These represent the peak of coal burning technology and are serious heaters. They may burn coal or wood as desired. They also have lots of nickel trim and are impressive from any angle. I have models from Glenwood, Wing's Best, Crawford, Tessier, and Herald. They start at $2800 and up depending on model and size.